How I learned to draw people of color

Artist Jane Hsi discusses race aesthetics in art and how she made a conscious effort to create more diverse representations in her own artwork.

Jane Hsi is a senior at the University of Oklahoma triple-majoring in Biochemistry, Letters, and Studio Art. Although this seems like a strange combination of majors, Jane enjoys how the diversity of these fields allows her to use both the analytical and creative sides of her brain. Thanks to the incredible dedication and patience of her professors—from both the science and the art departments—Jane has found a passion for art academia and for oil painting. She hopes to continue working with her community and with fellow artists to challenge aesthetic standards in art and society. She is currently curating an exhibition at OU that will showcase artists from around the nation with the theme of the works being the relationship between race and aesthetics. Although she tries to keep herself busy with classes, student organizations, and studio work, Jane does find time to relax by reading a good novel, biking in cold weather, Skyping with her family in China, and speed-napping between class

How communities can support teachers through innovative housing solutions

In the 19th century, teachers were often provided free housing in the form of a teacherage. In this talk Gregg Garn discusses innovative ways to modernize this idea for the 21st century and improve quality of life for our communities’ best teachers.

Gregg A. Garn, Ph.D., is the Dean of the Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education at the University of Oklahoma and the executive dir
ector of the K20 Center for Educational and Community Renewal.  He holds the Humphreys Dean’s Chair and the Linda Clarke Anderson Presidential Professorship. He is a professor of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies. Dr. Garn is active in several national organizations, including the Politics of Education Association, the University Council for Educational Administration, and the American Educational Research Association.  His research agenda centers on school choice, policy development and implementation and the politics of education. He has authored articles in Educational Administration Quarterly, Education and Urban Society, Education Policy Analysis Archives, Journal of School Leadership and Educational Leadership. He has served as PI or Co-PI on projects overseeing over $40 million in grants from various government and private funders. He has wo

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Using technology to facilitate “aha!” moments

In evolutionary biology, an exaptation is a trait that is co-opted for a purpose other than that for which it had originally evolved. Dave King explains how technology and big data can mimic exaptation to create new, cross-discipline ideas.

Dave King has been involved in high-tech entrepreneurship since the early 1990s. He has over 15 years experience in all aspects of software development, from system architecture to large-scale database design to the psychology of user interfaces and management of Agile development teams. Dave helped pioneer paperless manufacturing information systems in the electronics industry, then focused on designing extensible software systems for ad hoc visualization and analysis of large-scale multidimensional datasets. In 2011, Dave saw the need for a more modular and cross-disciplinary approach to data science and founded Exaptive, Inc. in order to pursue ways that technology and community can be combined to facilitate innovation. In 2015, his company was named as one of five Cool New Vendors in the life sciences by Gartner and an Innovator of Year by the Journal Record and in 2016 was selected by the Bloor Group as one of the top 10 companies and technologies to watch. Dave holds a BS from MI

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Making sports your secret weapon

Amy shares how being up-to-date on sports knowledge can be a valuable tool for connecting at the office, at networking events, or even on a date.

Amy is the quarterback and co-founder of Last Night’s Game, a site for the sports curious; a safe haven to empower those who want to learn about the world of sports but don’t know where to start. While her athletic participation was short lived, Amy fell in love with the world of sports. That learned love for sports came in handy when she embarked on her career path which began in professional sports. She’s lived internationally and continues to travel anywhere and everywhere, which provides her with a global sports perspective. A master of small talk, bringing people together and the handwritten note (the art is not dead), you can often find this married lady not sweating the small stuff while embracing her inner domestic goddess or talking sports with her brother and co-founder.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Beau Jennings performs selections from “Verdigris”

Songwriter and documentarian Beau Jennings performs original songs from his most recent project, Verdigris, based on the life of Will Rogers.

Beau Jennings is a musician, filmmaker, and former architect currently based in Oklahoma. Originally the frontman and songwriter for the indie-rock/Americana band Cheyenne, he toured the U.S. while calling both Brooklyn and Austin home. Jennings’ latest project is a documentary film and accompanying album entitled The Verdigris: In Search of Will Rogers, retracing Will Rogers’ life journey from coast to coast and retelling his story through original songs.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Doug Gaffin’s Navigation by Deja Vu

Dr. Doug Gaffin takes an in-depth look at how the unique structure of a bee’s eye helps her take in information and successfully navigate her world and how future technologies might use the same method.

Doug Gaffin earned his PhD from Oregon State University in 1994 and joined the OU faculty in 1995. He is a professor in the Department of Biology and former dean of University College. Doug has taught Introductory Zoology to more than 20,000 students throughout his career and is currently teaching honors courses as part of the Presidential Teaching Fellows in Honors Program. He has received the Outstanding Freshman Advocate Award from the National Center for the First-Year Experience, the Regents’ Award for Superior Teaching, and the David Ross Boyd Professorship. Dr. Gaffin’s research focuses on understanding the special sensory abilities of scorpions and other arthropods. In his spare time, he enjoys volleyball, camping, biking, hiking, and playing the banjo.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Crimson Chords Performance

A performance by OU a cappella group The Crimson Chords.

Founded in 2006 as an all-girls group, The Crimson Chords today are OU’s only co-ed, student-led, contemporary a cappella ensemble. The members of The Crimson Chords write their own a cappella arrangements of music from a variety of genres (indie, pop, film scores, musical theatre, and anything else you could think of) and perform them at their mid-semester and end-of-semester concerts, as well as campus events and small local venues.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Jonathan Stalling on Improving English Pronunciation Using Chinese Characters

Dr. Jonathan Stalling shares a novel technique to help native Mandarin Chinese speakers improve their pronunciation of English

Jonathan Stalling is an Associate Professor of English at OU specializing in Modern-Contemporary American and East-West Poetics, Comparative Literature, and Translation Studies and is the co-founder and editor of Chinese Literature Today. Over the last 15 years, Stalling has explored the poetics of transliteration and interlanguages (his thesis at the University of Edinburgh in 2000 was entitled “Prefacing the Text: Toward a Transliterational Telos”) and this work led to the publication of Yingelishi and more recently Phonotaxis, but over the last several years this preoccupation has led to larger projects on accents in language as epistemic space and on radical new paradigms of ESL pedagogy.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Connor Sullivan’s Journey of Hearing

Connor Sullivan was born with hearing loss and received a cochlear implant after going completely deaf as a young adult. Now as a doctor of audiology student, he shares the science behind cochlear implants and how this technology changes people’s life trajectories.

Connor Sullivan is a Doctor of Audiology graduate student at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Connor, born with a hearing loss, currently has a cochlear implant and a hearing aid. Connor received his Bachelors of Science from the University of Oklahoma in December 2014. Connor currently is a Graduate Clinical Assistant for the Cleft Palate and Craniofacial team as well as a Graduate Research Assistant for the Hearing Evaluation, Rehabilitation, and Outcomes Laboratory at OUHSC. Connor has presented both nationally and internationally on the topic of Large Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome, the disorder that resulted in his hearing loss. Connor is passionate about using his personal experiences alongside clinical knowledge in audiology to help children and their families who are impacted by hearing loss.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx

Merleyn Bell On Being Biracial and Becoming Color Brave

Merleyn Bell is a biracial woman who founded a local radio show to talk about difficult issues centered around race. In this Talk, she stresses the importance of having uncomfortable conversations and shares insights she’s learned from doing just that.

Merleyn Bell is Art Director at the University of Oklahoma’s premiere literary publication, World Literature Today. In 2015, Merleyn created the radio show Race Matters as a platform for conversations with authors, activists, and scholars about the pressing topic of race. The show enriches the diverse offerings from World Literature Today, which celebrates its 90th year of continuous publication in 2016. During her decade-long tenure at World Literature Today, she has led the creation and development of the organization’s print and digital publications. Her design work has garnered many awards and made her a sought-after consultant to publications the world over. Before joining the staff at World Literature Today, Merleyn worked as a student intern for the organization. She now enjoys mentoring a new generation of students who are curious about the magazine publishing industry. Merleyn also works with a number of clients in the nonprofit sector, using her design expertise to help them

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx